Freelance Hacks: Do less and get more done


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Lifestyle & Time out

Multi-tasking - by Chim Chim

As a freelancer with multiple clients, multiple deadlines and multiple todo lists it can be hard to know what to focus on next – so rather than choose we often end up doing two, or more, things at once. As part of a series of posts on Getting Things Done for Freelancers Leo Babauta of Zen Habits explains why multitasking is not the solution

How NOT to Multitask – Work Simpler & Saner

You’re working on two projects at once, and a new potential client has just called to ask about your availability. You’re on the phone while three new emails come in. You are trying to get everything done before your partner comes home so you can start cooking dinner. Your Blackberry is going off and so is your mobile, your friends want to know if you can make it for a drink tonight and your Google Reader is filled with 100+ messages to read.

You are juggling tasks with a speed worthy of Ringling Bros. Congratulations, multitasker.

In this age of instant technology, we are bombarded with an overload of information and demands of our time. This is part of the reason Getting Things Done (GTD) is so popular in the information world — it’s a system designed for quick decisions and for keeping all the demands of your life in order. But even if we are using GTD, sometimes we are so overwhelmed with things to do that our system begins to fall apart.

Life Hack recently posted How to Multi-task, and it’s a good article on the nature of multi-tasking and how to do it while still focusing on one task at a time.

This post is How NOT to Multi-task — a guide to working as simply as possible for your mental health…

First, a few quick reasons not to multi-task:

  1. Multi-tasking is less efficient, due to the need to switch gears for each new task, and the switch back again.
  2. Multi-tasking is more complicated, and thus more prone to stress and errors.
  3. Multi-tasking can be crazy, and in this already chaotic world, we need to reign in the terror and find a little oasis of sanity and calm.

Here are some tips on how NOT to multi-task:

  1. First set up to-do lists for different contexts (i.e. calls, computer, errands, home, waiting-for, etc.) depending on your situation.
  2. Have a capture tool (such as a notebook) for instant notes on what needs to be done.
  3. Have a physical and email inbox (as few inboxes as possible) so that all incoming stuff is gathered together in one place (one for paper stuff, one for digital).
  4. Plan your day in blocks, with open blocks in between for urgent stuff that comes up. You might try one-hour blocks, or half-hour blocks, depending on what works for you. Or try this: 40 minute blocks, with 20 minutes in between them for miscellaneous tasks.
  5. First thing in the morning, work on your Most Important Task. Don’t do anything else until this is done. Give yourself a short break, and then start on your next Most Important Task. If you can get 2-3 of these done in the morning, the rest of the day is gravy.
  6. When you are working on a task in a time block, turn off all other distractions. Shut off email, and the Internet if possible. Shut off your cell phone. Try not to answer your phone if possible. Focus on that one task, and try to get it done without worrying about other stuff.
  7. If you feel the urge to check your email or switch to another task, stop yourself. Breathe deeply. Re-focus yourself. Get back to the task at hand.
  8. If other things come in while you’re working, put them in the inbox, or take a note of them in your capture system. Get back to the task at hand.
  9. Every now and then, when you’ve completed the task at hand, process your notes and inbox, adding the tasks to your to-do lists and re-figuring your schedule if necessary. Process your email and other inboxes at regular and pre-determined intervals.
  10. There are times when an interruption is so urgent that you cannot put it off until you’re done with the task at hand. In that case, try to make a note of where you are (writing down notes if you have time) with the task at hand, and put all the documents or notes for that task together and aside (perhaps in an “action” folder or project folder). Then, when you come back to that task, you can pull out your folder and look at your notes to see where you left off.
  11. Take deep breaths, stretch, and take breaks now and then. Enjoy life. Go outside, and appreciate nature. Keep yourself sane.
By Leo Babauta, author of ZenHabits and a new book The Power of Less

image by Chim Chim
  • Dan

    For implementing GTD you can use this web-based application:

    http://www.Gtdagenda.com

    You can use it to manage your goals, projects and tasks, set next actions and contexts, use checklists, schedules and a calendar.
    A mobile version is available too.

  • Dan

    For implementing GTD you can use this web-based application:

    http://www.Gtdagenda.com

    You can use it to manage your goals, projects and tasks, set next actions and contexts, use checklists, schedules and a calendar.
    A mobile version is available too.

  • nirmal

    i think you have the wrong credit to the image here- this image was not taken by me

  • nirmal

    i think you have the wrong credit to the image here- this image was not taken by me

  • http://www.freelanceadvisor.co.uk/contributors/michael-rose/ Michael Rose

    @Dan: Thanks for the pointer… there are loads of “GTD solutions” software out there and GTDagenda is particularly well-suited to the ZenToDone approach that Leo pioneered.

    Remember the Milk is also a good choice.

    Personally I use OmniFocus on the Mac which syncs beautifully with iPhone and really helps people to plan in projects and do in context… it literally forces you to do GTD rather than just play at doing GTD… something I need to stay on the wagon!

    @Nirmal: Thanks for spotting that Nirmal, not sure what happened there… the image is by Chim Chim (apologies to you both).

  • http://www.freelanceadvisor.co.uk/contributors/michael-rose/ Michael Rose

    @Dan: Thanks for the pointer… there are loads of “GTD solutions” software out there and GTDagenda is particularly well-suited to the ZenToDone approach that Leo pioneered.

    Remember the Milk is also a good choice.

    Personally I use OmniFocus on the Mac which syncs beautifully with iPhone and really helps people to plan in projects and do in context… it literally forces you to do GTD rather than just play at doing GTD… something I need to stay on the wagon!

    @Nirmal: Thanks for spotting that Nirmal, not sure what happened there… the image is by Chim Chim (apologies to you both).

  • http://www.mark-kirby.co.uk/ Mark Kirby

    Perfect, these simple steps are I believe the key to success – we achieve the seemingly impossible by following these same principles in the small company I work with – a great summary all should read!

  • http://www.mark-kirby.co.uk Mark Kirby

    Perfect, these simple steps are I believe the key to success – we achieve the seemingly impossible by following these same principles in the small company I work with – a great summary all should read!

  • http://www.freelanceadvisor.co.uk/ Malin Kilander

    Couldn’t agree more Leo! There is nothing worse than sitting on loads of unfinished tasks. It makes you feel stressed, unfocused, and your workload can seems immense.

    It’s very satisfying to be able to tick something of a list, and for every tick you will feel more confident and up for dealing with the next task.

  • http://www.freelanceadvisor.co.uk Malin Kilander

    Couldn’t agree more Leo! There is nothing worse than sitting on loads of unfinished tasks. It makes you feel stressed, unfocused, and your workload can seems immense.

    It’s very satisfying to be able to tick something of a list, and for every tick you will feel more confident and up for dealing with the next task.